Salisbury, England


After nearly four years of my whining about wanting to see Stonehenge, we finally made this happen.

Funnily, what made this trip really happen wasn’t my nagging but my desire to visit a tack shop in Wilton, which is right next to Salisbury. The things one does for the right boots…

So following our arrival we hopped on the Stonehenge Tour bus outside of the station and enjoyed a historical tour of Salisbury en route to Stonehenge.¬†Stonehenge is first visible from the A303. I saw it a few years ago en route to Cornwall, and it was such a surprise to see it there. if you want to see it a bit closer, you have to buy tickets and enter the site. Seeing Stonehenge doesn’t require a lot of time. We walked around the site in its entirety in about 40 minutes. There’s a free audio guide as well, but we decided to skip that because we hoped to take the earlier bus back into Salisbury.

The Pheasant Inn

We took the tour bus to Blue Boar Inn, a listed building right near the city’s Guildhall and Central Marketplace in search of lunch at The Pheasant Inn, a pub located in an old 16th century inn.

After an undocumented lunch of Steak & Ale pie and Bangers & Mash, we headed off in search of the perfect riding boots.

Equishop came highly recommended by a riding instructor I know,and given that I was having a miserable time finding boots, it seemed worth the trek. Unfortunately, my experience wasn’t as good as his was. The overall customer service and selection available within the shop was quite good, but the fitter who helped me seemed very content to sell me a pair of Ariat boots that had way too much free space in the calf. My acquaintance’s experience was completely different. he joked that they made him try on every pair in the store and checked the fit like he was five years old, which was exactly what I was looking for. Would I go there again, yes, but something I’ve learned on this boot hunt is that you need to find the right fitter and I didn’t do that in this case. (I’ve since found boots and am a happy girl.)

Cathedral Exterior

So, leaving the shop a bit deflated and empty handed, we headed back into Salisbury to the Cathedral.

Salisbury Cathedral, built in the 13th century¬†is famous for its 123m spire, the tallest in England. One can visit the base of the spire via 332 steps on organized tours, but we arrived too late for the last one on a summer Saturday (1530). It’s also famous for being the home to one of the four original copies of the Magna Carta and houses the world’s oldest, still functioning clock, built in 1382.

I’ve included some interior pictures of the Cathedral, but photos in the Chapter House, where the Magna Carta is housed, were not permitted.

After seeing the Cathedral, we had a bit of a wander around the City Center, followed by a pint at The Chough. A chough is a type of bird – I learn something new every day.

Then, unfortunately, it was time to head back to the rail station!

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